Be patient if you have Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) (kneecap pain) - Nose Creek Sport Physiotherapy
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Be patient if you have Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) (kneecap pain)

As we mentioned in the previous blog article in the first week, PFPS is a muscle imbalance in the knee. These muscle imbalances will get better in 3 weeks as you can establish normal flexibility (normal length of the muscle) in 3 weeks, but the strengthening will take 6 -12 weeks to build up the muscle endurance and strength.

Most muscles will increase in tone early, but the physical growth of the muscle (or the hypertrophy) will take more than 6 weeks. Muscles start to increase in girth and size after 6 weeks of exercising them. This is why we tell our clients that recovering from PFPS is a 3 month experience for most people, not a 3 week experience. Be the turtle in the race to your recovery and do your program on a regular basis. This will help you beat this condition. Next week we will highlight the 3 key exercises to work on – stay tuned!

If you have kneecap pain it is not getting better, you need to give us a call at Beddington (403.295.8590), and we are happy to help you fully resolve your Patellofemoral knee pain.

Blair Schachterle BScPT, Dip Manip PT, Dip Sport PT, FCAMPT, CGIMS

Blair Schachterle BScPT, Dip Manip PT, Dip Sport PT, FCAMPT, CGIMS

Blair has been a Physiotherapist at Nose Creek Sport Physiotherapy since 2001. Blair graduated from the University of Alberta with a BScPT in 1992. He has focused on Orthopaedic Manual Therapy and Sport Therapy. Blair completed his Sport Therapy Diploma in 1997, and his Advanced Manual and Manipulative Diploma in 1998. Blair is also certified for IMS (Intramuscular Stimulation) Dry Needling. Blair has a keen interest in active rehabilitation of recent and chronic, spinal and peripheral, joint and muscle injuries. He enjoys treating upper neck pain that is associated with cervical tension headaches, sciatica (pinched nerve in lower back), shoulder injuries and traumatic knee injuries. Blair previously served for 6 years as the Executive Chair of the Canadian Academy of Manipulative Therapy (CAMPT).

Blair balances his busy professional life by staying active. He enjoys cycling, swimming, working out, hiking, camping and snowboarding, depending on the season. Blair shares his free time with his wife, son and daughter outside on the weekends. He has learned to enjoy the journey, as life really is too short.
Blair Schachterle BScPT, Dip Manip PT, Dip Sport PT, FCAMPT, CGIMS

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